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This week on WDD’s HotSpot:

  • Tokyo-based startup Fove has developed a head mounted display with eye-tracking technology. Featuring a variety of sensors, including a high-refresh gyroscope, accelerometer, and magnetometer sensor, this device allows users to control things with their gaze. According to Fove, the display adjusts focus of a scene by determining where in the 3D space the user is looking through tracking their gaze and parallax, making it ideal for gaming, amusement park, and medical applications.
  • Siemens' central research department and the electric vehicle manufacturer StreetScooter are going to equip an electric car with an innovative electronic and software architecture that will make it possible to retrofit functions such as electrical brakes and systems such as lane-keeping assistants using a plug-and-play process like on home PCs. The associated technology was developed during the RACE project, or Robust and Reliant Automotive Computing Environment for Future eCars, which aims to simplify cars’ increasingly complex electronics architecture. An uniformed architecture would enable developers to create new functions quickly and easily. In addition, software functions could be pushed out to vehicles in the same way that they are to smart phones. The functions would range from infotainment software all the way to critical safety functions such as driver assistance systems.
  • GPS has come a long way since it was first introduced, however, as revolutionary as it has been it still has its limitations. According to DARPA, GPS signals cannot be received underground or underwater and can be significantly degraded or unavailable during solar storms. More worrisome is that adversaries can jam signals. GPS continues to be vital, but its limitations in some environments could make it an Achilles’ heel if warfighters rely on it as their sole source of PNT (positioning, navigation, and timing) information. To address this problem, several DARPA programs are exploring innovative technologies and approaches that could eventually provide reliable, highly accurate PNT capabilities when GPS capabilities are degraded or unavailable.
  • Back in the day, glasses weren’t as hip as they are today. Today they come in all shapes, sizes, and colors to help people define themselves and make their own personal fashion statement. But some people still aren’t fans of having something extra to carry around or worry about. So researchers at UC Berkeley are developing computer algorithms to compensate for an individual’s visual impairment, and creating vision-correcting displays that enable users to see text and images clearly without wearing eyeglasses or contact lenses. The technology could potentially help hundreds of millions of people who currently need corrective lenses to use their smartphones, tablets and computers. The displays could also one day aid people with more complex visual problems, known as high order aberrations, which cannot be corrected by eyeglasses.

Do you have story ideas? Comment below or email wdd_web@advantagemedia.com we'll cover them in an upcoming episode.

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