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Shaky Hand, Stable Spoon: Device Helps Essential Tremor

February 28, 2014 10:48 am | by University of Michigan Health System | News | Comments

For people whose hands shake uncontrollably due to a medical condition, just eating can be a frustrating and embarrassing ordeal – enough to keep them from sharing a meal with others. But a small new study conducted at the University of Michigan Health System suggests that a new handheld electronic device can help...

Cloudpath Brings Automated Device Enablement to Healthcare Industry

February 25, 2014 4:43 pm | by Cloudpath Networks | News | Comments

Cloudpath Networks has introduced its XpressConnect Enrollment System 3.0 for healthcare organizations looking to bring scalability, sustainability and security to their Wi-Fi networks. XpressConnect ES provides self-service, automated onboarding...

3-D Printer Creates Transformative Device for Heart Treatment

February 25, 2014 12:52 pm | by Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

Using an inexpensive 3-D printer, biomedical engineers have developed a custom-fitted, implantable device with embedded sensors that could transform treatment and prediction of cardiac disorders. An international team of biomedical engineers and materials scientists have created a 3-D elastic membrane...

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HotSpot Episode 51: Cancer Glasses Make Cells Glow Blue

February 24, 2014 10:12 am | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development | Videos | Comments

This week on WDD’s HotSpot: the Aura, electronic musical instrument; the CuffLinc from Cuff creates a protective circle; high-tech glasses that may help surgeons visualize cancer cells, which glow blue when viewed through the eyewear; and vehicle to vehicle communication from the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute...

Single Chip Device to Provide Real-time 3D Images from Inside the Body

February 19, 2014 3:40 pm | by Georgia Institute of Technology | News | Comments

Researchers have developed the technology for a catheter-based device that would provide forward-looking, real-time, three-dimensional imaging from inside the heart, coronary arteries and peripheral blood vessels. With its volumetric imaging, the new device could better guide surgeons...

Photos of the Day: Real-time 3D Images with a Single Chip

February 19, 2014 3:40 pm | by Georgia Institute of Technology | News | Comments

Researchers have developed the technology for a catheter-based device that would provide forward-looking, real-time, three-dimensional imaging from inside the heart, coronary arteries and peripheral blood vessels. With its volumetric imaging, the new device could better guide surgeons...

Engineering Newswire 77: BAE Unveils Britain’s Super-Drone

February 19, 2014 3:08 pm | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development | Videos | Comments

Today on Engineering Newswire, we’re teaching UAVs to fly on their own, visualizing tumors during surgery, and unveiling Britain’s new super-drone ...                                  

Kinetic Battery Chargers Get a Boost

February 19, 2014 2:42 pm | by Inderscience Publishers | News | Comments

New technology to capture the kinetic energy of our everyday movements, such as walking, and to convert it into electrical energy has come a step closer thanks to research to be published in the International Journal Biomechatronics and Biomedical Robotics...

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Nanodiamond-embedded Contact Lenses for Glaucoma Treatment

February 19, 2014 10:25 am | by DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory | News | Comments

By 2020, nearly 80 million people are expected to have glaucoma, a disorder of the eye that, if left untreated, can damage the optic nerve and eventually lead to blindness. The disease often causes pressure in the eye due to a buildup of fluid and a breakdown of the tissue that is responsible for regulating fluid drainage...

Exclusive: Providing Prosthetics With a Sense of Touch

February 19, 2014 9:27 am | by Meaghan Ziemab, Editor | Articles | Comments

Losing the ability to move is a traumatic experience, mentally and physically, but recent advances in medical technologies have helped tetraplegics regain a part of their lives they once thought to be lost forever. Losing the ability to move results in the loss of touch, a sense necessary to perform the most basic tasks – from...

All a Board to 2014

February 19, 2014 9:14 am | by Meaghan Ziemba, Editor | Blogs | Comments

2013 was a very exciting year. After I joined the Wireless Design & Development (WDD) team, we launched three new video products, and created a fresh look for our daily newsletter and print issue. But we aren’t finished yet as WDD has great things in store for...

New Vishay Intertechnology SMD NTC Thermistors

February 18, 2014 5:20 pm | Product Releases | Comments

Vishay Intertechnology introduced a new series of SMD NTC thermistors with enhanced stability for temperature sensing and compensation circuits. Optimized for heat counters, body thermometers, and other medical applications, the thermistors released today offer one R25 value per case...

Technology to Link Patient Records Being Developed

February 18, 2014 12:22 pm | by Case Western Reserve University | News | Comments

Although trauma, heart and stroke patients benefit from being transferred from a local hospital to a higher-level care facility, it’s unclear why patients transferred with non-urgent medical conditions show at least a 30 percent higher death rate than had they stayed put, according to researchers from Case Western Reserve University’s nursing school.

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HotSpot Episode 50: Blinking Beacons Help Planes Miss Wind Turbines

February 18, 2014 10:54 am | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development | Videos | Comments

This week on WDD's HotSpot, a low-power, signal-processing chip that could lead to a chochlear implant with not external hardware; synthetic motors that live inside human cells; a sensor solution for blinking beacons on wind turbines; and a clever detector array...                    

Miami Hotels Use Technology to Help Sick Guests

February 13, 2014 5:16 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Some Miami hotels are teaming up with a program to offer out-of-town guests who are feeling under the weather a convenient way to hook up with a doctor. If travelers are suffering from anything from an earache to the flu, they can contact the hotel concierge or front desk to coordinate a new medical technology platform.

First 3-D Movies of Living Sperm

February 12, 2014 10:16 am | by The Optical Society | News | Comments

To improve their chances of success, in vitro fertilization clinics need to assess the viability of the sperm they use. Now doctors may soon have a new technique to help them sort the good sperm cells from the less viable ones: a tracking system that takes 3-D movies of living sperm...

Design Prototype Chip Makes Possible a Fully Implantable Cochlear Implant

February 11, 2014 10:36 am | by Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary | News | Comments

Researchers from Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Harvard Medical School, and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have designed a prototype system-on-chip (SoC) that could make possible a fully implanted cochlear implant. They will present their findings on Feb. 11at the IEEE International Solid State Circuits Conference in San Francisco...

Chips That Listen to Bacteria

February 11, 2014 10:05 am | by Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science | News | Comments

A research team has demonstrated that integrated circuit technology, the basis of modern computers and communications devices, can be used for a most unusual application—the study of signaling in bacterial colonies. They have developed a chip based on complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology...

Cochlear Implants with No Exterior Hardware

February 10, 2014 9:28 am | by Massachusetts Institute of Technology | News | Comments

Cochlear implants — medical devices that electrically stimulate the auditory nerve — have granted at least limited hearing to hundreds of thousands of people worldwide who otherwise would be totally deaf. Existing versions of the device, however, require that a disk-shaped transmitter about an inch in diameter be affixed to the skull...

Step to Artificial Hand That Feels What You Touch

February 6, 2014 9:49 am | by LAURAN NEERGAARD, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

It's not quite the bionics of science fiction, but European researchers have created a robotic hand that gave an amputee a sense of touch he hadn't felt in a decade. The experiment lasted only a week, but it let the patient feel if different objects — a bottle, a baseball, some cotton, a mandarin orange — were hard or soft, slim or round, and intuitively adjust his grasp...

Electronically Controlled Drugs Could Minimize Side Effects

February 6, 2014 9:34 am | by American Chemical Society | News | Comments

Potential side effects of many of today's therapeutic drugs can be downright frightening — just listen carefully to a drug commercial on TV. These effects often occur when a drug is active throughout the body, not just where and when it is needed. But scientists are reporting progress on a new tailored approach to deliver medicine in a much more targeted way...

HotSpot Episode 48: High-Tech Bra Tracks True Love

February 3, 2014 9:57 am | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development | Videos | Comments

This week on WDD's HotSpot, an electronic, beer-tasting tongue; a high-tech bra that only opens for true love; smart shorts that tracks how you're working your muscles; and bionic contact lens that produce tactile sensations to help guide the blind...                       

Engineering Newswire 75: First Porsche Ever Made Found 115 Years Later

January 31, 2014 8:08 am | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development | Videos | Comments

Today on Engineering Newswire, we’re printing multi-material in color, detecting mines with our shoes, cutting catalytic converter costs, and riding the first Porsche ever made. This episode features ...                      

Self-Aligning DNA Wires for Application in Nanoelectronics

January 30, 2014 3:45 pm | by Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf | News | Comments

Since continuous miniaturization in microelectronics is already starting to reach the physical limits, researchers are seeking new methods for device fabrication. One promising candidate is the DNA origami technique in which individual strands of the biomolecule self-assemble into arbitrarily shaped nanostructures...

Nintendo Chief Stays On, Health Business Planned

January 30, 2014 10:47 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Nintendo has been unable to arrest a slide in console sales as more people play games on smartphones and tablets. The company's apparent solution? A move into health care. Nintendo president Satoru Iwata vowed Thursday to stick to the company's old ways, refused to resign or cut product prices despite its dismal earnings...

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