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Meaghan's Minute: Adoption of Wireless Power

December 9, 2013 2:20 pm | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development | Videos | Comments

Keynote speaker, Ryan Sanderson, who is the Associate Director of Power Supply and Storage Components at HIS, gave his perspective on the adoption of wireless power internationally at the Wireless Power Summit in Austin, TX...                       

HotSpot Episode 42: NASA's Sunjamming Solar Sail

December 9, 2013 11:44 am | Videos | Comments

On this episode of WDD's HotSpot, brought to you by SanDisk, helping an aging population with chronic healthcare problems; the final step before solar sails are launched into space; a rehabilitation device for stroke vicitms; and a jacket that tell you where to go...

Photos of the Day: Mini Microscopes

December 9, 2013 11:14 am | by Dr. Johan Lundin, University of Helsinki | News | Comments

Researchers at the Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland, FIMM, University of Helsinki and Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, have now shown that novel techniques for high-resolution imaging and image transfer over data networks may be utilized to solve these diagnostic problems...

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Stripped Mobile Phone Camera Turned into a Mini-Microscope for Low-Cost Diagnostics

December 9, 2013 11:13 am | by Dr. Johan Lundin, University of Helsinki | News | Comments

Microscopy, being relatively easy to perform at low cost, is the universal diagnostic method for detection of most globally important parasitic infections. Methods developed in well-equipped laboratories are, however, difficult to maintain at the basic levels of the health care system due to lack of adequately trained...

Pioneering Path to Electrical Conductivity in 'Tinker Toy' Materials to Appear in Science

December 9, 2013 10:56 am | by Mike Janes, DOE/Sandia National Laboratories | News | Comments

Sandia National Laboratories researchers have devised a novel way to realize electrical conductivity in metal-organic framework (MOF) materials, a development that could have profound implications for the future of electronics, sensors, energy conversion and...

Photos of the Day: Electric Skin Connects Patients' Data with Doctors

December 6, 2013 10:06 am | by National Institute of Biological Imaging and Bioengineering | News | Comments

An international multidisciplinary team including researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana/Champaign and the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) has developed a sophisticated ”electronic skin” that adheres non-invasively to human skin, conforms well to contours, and provides a detailed ...

Ultrathin "Diagnostic Skin" Allows Continuous Patient Monitoring

December 6, 2013 9:58 am | by National Institute of Biological Imaging and Bioengineering | News | Comments

It is likely that at your next visit to the doctor, a medical practitioner will start by taking your temperature. This has been part of medical practice for so long that we may see it as antiquated, with little value. However, the routine nature of the ritual belies the critical importance of obtaining ...

Engineering Newswire: First Government-Recognized Cyborg Gets His Passport

December 6, 2013 9:26 am | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development | Videos | Comments

Today on Engineering Newswire, we’re doodling working circuits, test firing new rocket engines, having fun being a Borg, and using your smartphone as a 3D scanner ...             

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Photos of the Day: High Resolution X-Rays

December 5, 2013 10:31 am | by MIT | News | Comments

A test device built at MIT as a proof-of-principle for the new, higher-resolution X-ray system, using a vacuum chamber that measures 8 inches across. The team expects that eventual production models would be ...      

A Leap Forward in X-Ray Technology

December 5, 2013 9:54 am | by David L. Chandler, MIT | News | Comments

X-rays transformed medicine a century ago by providing a noninvasive way to detect internal structures in the body. Still, they have limitations: X-rays cannot image the body’s soft tissues, except with the use of contrast-enhancing agents that must be swallowed or injected, and their resolution is limited. But a new approach ...

Tune in, Turn on, Power up

December 5, 2013 9:50 am | by Jennifer Lauren Lee, American Institute of Physics | News | Comments

Human beings don't come with power sockets, but a growing numbers of us have medical implants that run off electricity. To keep our bionic body parts from powering down, a group of Arizona researchers is developing a safe, noninvasive, and efficient means of wireless power transmission through ...

Heart-Hacking is Possible Paranoia

December 4, 2013 5:14 pm | by Julia Blaikie, WDD Intern | Blogs | Comments

Like other wireless electronic systems, medical devices can be hacked. While it may not make sense to think that anyone would want to wirelessly access your medical implant to destroy you, neither does thinking someone would...   

A State-of-the-Art Magnetic Resonance Scanner

December 3, 2013 10:18 am | by Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology | News | Comments

The Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology in Warsaw launches research programs, which require state-of-the-art magnetic resonance scanner. Such a device has been put in operation in the newly opened Laboratory of ...    

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HotSpot Episode 41: Smartphone-Controlled Smartplane

December 2, 2013 10:20 am | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development | Videos | Comments

This week on WDD’s HotSpot, brought to you by National Instruments, a smartphone-controlled smartplane; a nano camera that can operate at the speed of light; Microsoft and Sony have delivered their newest generation of high-powered video games; and a custom Bluetooth 4.0 LE chip that enables wireless programming...

Photos of the Day: Magnetic Tongue Piercing Controls Wheelchair

December 2, 2013 9:32 am | by Associated Press | News | Comments

Researchers reported Wednesday that 11 people paralyzed from the neck down rapidly learned to use the tongue device to pilot their wheelchairs through an obstacle course full of twists and turns, and to operate a computer, too...                

Tongue Piercing Lets the Paralyzed Drive Wheelchairs

December 2, 2013 9:31 am | by Associated Press | News | Comments

An experimental device is letting paralyzed people drive wheelchairs simply by flicking their tongue in the right direction. Key to this wireless system: Users get their tongue pierced with a magnetic stud that resembles jewelry and acts like a joystick...      

100 W Low PIM Termination from P1dB

November 26, 2013 5:09 pm | by WDD Staff | Product Releases | Comments

RFMW announced design and sales support for P1dB’s 100 Watt, low PIM termination...

HotSpot Episode 40: Hammerhead Aircraft Complete First Test Flight

November 25, 2013 11:50 am | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development | Videos | Comments

This week on WDD's HotSpot, brough to you by SanDisk...                                               

Photos of the Day: Using Sensors to Understand Insect-Vectored Diseases

November 25, 2013 10:55 am | by Sean Nealon, University of California - Riverside | News | Comments

Grand Challenges Explorations funds individuals worldwide to explore ideas that can break the mold in how we solve persistent global health and development challenges. Chen's project is one of more than 80 Grand Challenges...                

Using Data to Fight Malaria

November 25, 2013 10:54 am | by Sean Nealon, University of California - Riverside | News | Comments

The University of California, Riverside announced today that it is a Grand Challenges Explorations winner, an initiative funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Yanping Chen will pursue an innovative global health and development research...

World’s Tallest Waterslide Now 17-Stories High

November 22, 2013 11:36 am | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development | Videos | Comments

Today on Engineering Newswire, we’re scanning balloon dogs, rescuing swimmers with robots, protecting our wine collections, and riding the world’s tallest, wettest, fastest waterslide ...         

Ultrasound, Nanoparticles May Help Diabetics Avoid the Needle

November 21, 2013 5:24 pm | by Matt Shipman, NC State University | News | Comments

A new nanotechnology-based technique for regulating blood sugar in diabetics may give patients the ability to release insulin painlessly using a small ultrasound device, allowing them to go days between injections – rather than using needles to...

Study Reveals Potential Breakthrough in Hearing Technology

November 19, 2013 9:55 am | by Pam Frost Gorder | News | Comments

Computer engineers and hearing scientists at The Ohio State University have made a potential breakthrough in solving a 50-year-old problem in hearing technology: how to help the hearing-impaired understand speech in the midst of background noise...

Engineering Newswire 65: Efficient Batteries Go Viral

November 18, 2013 10:17 am | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development | Videos | Comments

Today on Engineering Newswire, we’re launching drones from tiny boats, recycling shower water, using sensors to prevent serious brain injuries, and making batteries more efficient by going viral ...       

HotSpot Episode 39: Watson's Return

November 18, 2013 9:54 am | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development | Videos | Comments

This week on WDD's Hotspot, brought to you by National Instruments, a product that combines all of your credit cards into one, easy-to-use device; Jeopardy superstar, Watson returns; the EnOcean Alliance introduces its generic profiles; and an app to help drivers locate alternative fueling stations...

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