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Wearable Technology Alters Your Mind, Like Drugs

January 12, 2015 10:56 am | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development | Videos | Comments

This week in WDD's HotSpot, predictive cruise control that reacts to other vehicles; wearable technology that altrers you mind, like drugs; Nissan and NASA team up to create autonomous cars; an SDHC memory card that features NFC; and DARPA's program for tiny UAVs ...             

Photos of the Day: Smart Solutions for a Connected World

January 7, 2015 10:50 am | by Bosch | News | Comments

The world is becoming more connected, and at times, it seems as though the Internet and globalization have developed a momentum of their own. Companies like Bosch can help shape these developments. At the International Consumer Electronics Show (CES) 2015, Bosch will be ...                    

OKW’s New Round & Oval SYNERGY Extruded Enclosures

January 6, 2015 12:26 pm | by WDD Staff | Product Releases | Comments

OKW has added new Round and Oval models to its new range of SYNERGY electronic enclosures – its first to be manufactured from both plastic and aluminum ...  

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Sense by Hello: One of the Year's Most-Backed Kickstarter Projects

January 6, 2015 10:13 am | by Janine E. Mooney, Editor in Chief | @JMooneyWDD | Blogs | Comments

If you’re not familiar with Kickstarter, it's a place where creators and "backers" make projects come to life. The creators set a funding goal and deadline and if backers like the project, they can pledge money to help get the ball rolling. Kickstarter funding is an all-or-nothing type deal, meaning if the projects don't hit ... 

HotSpot Episode 95: NASA's Rover Has Amnesia

January 5, 2015 10:25 am | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development | Videos | Comments

This week on WDD’s HotSpot: an unmanned helicopter, detecting extraterrestrial life, and NASA's Rover has amnesia. Northrop Grumman’s MQ-8C Fire Scout drone helicopter has made its first flight from a U.S. Navy destroyer. According to Capt. Jeff Dodge, who manages the program for Naval Air Systems ... 

NSF Grant to Turn Smartphones Into Biodetectors

January 5, 2015 1:58 am | by University of Illinois | News | Comments

When you go to the doctor to see if you have a sore throat, she’ll usually swab inside your mouth and then send a sample to the lab for analysis. This process generally takes a few days, by which time you’ll probably know whether you’re sick or not, anyway. Imagine that, instead, the doctor just slips out her smartphone, takes a ...

New Cell Marking Technique to Help Understand How Our Brain Works

January 2, 2015 9:46 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Scientists from the University of Southampton have developed a new technique to mark individual brain cells to help improve our understanding of how the brain works. In neuroscience research, it is a challenge to individually label cells and to track them over space or time. Our brain has billions of cells and to be able to ... 

3D Culture System for Pancreatic Cancer May Change Therapeutic Approaches

January 2, 2015 9:09 am | by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory | News | Comments

Pancreatic cancer is one of the most deadly forms of cancer, with only 6 percent of patients surviving five years after diagnosis. Today, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) and The Lustgarten Foundation jointly announce the development of a new model system to grow both normal and cancerous pancreatic cells in the ... 

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Detecting Extraterrestrial Life Through Motion

January 2, 2015 9:00 am | by Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne | News | Comments

Looking for life on other planets is not straightforward. It usually relies on chemical detection, which might be limited or even completely irrelevant to alien biology. On the other hand, motion is a trait of all life, and can be used to identify microorganisms without any need of chemical foreknowledge. EPFL scientists have now ... 

Smartphone Thumb Skills are Altering Our Brains

December 23, 2014 1:16 pm | by University of Zurich | News | Comments

Every region of the body -- from the toes to the jaw and tongue -- has a particular processing area in our emotional center in the brain, the somatosensory cortex. These areas are flexible and can change. In the case of violinists, for instance, the area representing the fingers that guide the instrument is larger than ... 

Double Amputee Becomes First to Control Two Robotic Arms with Only His Mind

December 19, 2014 9:56 am | by Alyssa Bereznak, Yahoo! Tech Columnist | News | Comments

This summer, 40 years after losing both of his arms in a freak electrical accident, Colorado resident Leslie Baugh got two new bionic limbs. And after just 10 days of training, he began using them to move objects from shelf to shelf, controlling them with only ...

Research Finds Graphene Oxide Can Improve Rechargeable Batteries

December 19, 2014 9:11 am | by Kansas State University | News | Comments

A Kansas State University engineering team has discovered some of graphene oxide's important properties that can improve sodium- and lithium-ion flexible batteries. Gurpreet Singh, assistant professor of mechanical and nuclear engineering, and Lamuel David, doctoral student in mechanical ... 

Out of the Lab, into the World

December 18, 2014 11:43 am | by Jessica Fujimori, MIT News correspondent | News | Comments

For MIT senior Anisha Gururaj, each of her varied interests — such as Indian classical dance and music, engineering medical devices, and education — is one piece of a larger puzzle: seeing the world from many different perspectives, and using those insights to make it a better place ...        

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New Technique Moves Researchers Closer to New Range of GaN Biosensors

December 18, 2014 11:17 am | by Dr. Albena Ivanisevic, Matt Shipman, North Carolina State University | News | Comments

Researchers from North Carolina State University have found a way of binding peptides to the surface of gallium nitride (GaN) in a way that keeps the peptides stable even when exposed to water and radiation. The discovery moves researchers one step closer to developing a new range of biosensors ...                     

November/December 2014 — Micro-Windmills: From Lab to Market

December 17, 2014 2:51 pm | by WDD Staff | Digital Editions | Comments

The November/December issue of Wireless Design & Development (WDD) is packed full of great content from Micro-Windmills to Connected Hospitals, Digital Pre-Distortion to Powering Underground Wireless Sensors, and beyond. Find out what our top industry leaders have to say about IoT impacting the cost of ...

Photos of the Day: 10-Degree Brain Control of a Prosthetic Device

December 17, 2014 10:05 am | by Anita Srikameswaran, University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences | News | Comments

The findings by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, published in the Journal of Neural Engineering, describe, for the first time, 10-degree brain control of a prosthetic device in which the trial participant used the arm and hand to reach, grasp, and place a variety of objects ...           

New Findings from Mind-Controlled Robot Arm Project Published

December 17, 2014 10:04 am | by Anita Srikameswaran, University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences | News | Comments

In another demonstration that brain-computer interface technology has the potential to improve the function and quality of life of those unable to use their own arms, a woman with quadriplegia shaped the almost human hand of a robot arm with just her thoughts to pick up big and small boxes, a ball, an oddly shaped rock, and fat and skinny tubes ...

Microwave Imaging System for Detecting Breast Cancer

December 16, 2014 4:44 pm | by Jason Socrates Bardi, American Institute of Physics | News | Comments

Although currently available diagnostic screening systems for breast cancer like X-ray computed tomography (CT) and mammography are effective at detecting early signs of tumors, they are far from perfect, subjecting patients to ionizing radiation and sometimes inflicting discomfort on women who are undergoing screening because ...                   

Eye Tracking Technology Asseses Brain Injuries

December 16, 2014 1:56 pm | by Jim Mandler, NYU Langone Medical Center/New York University School of Medicine | News | Comments

Researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center have developed new technology that can assess the location and impact of a brain injury merely by tracking the eye movements of patients as they watch music videos for less than four minutes, according to a study published Friday on-line in the Journal of Neurosurgery ...           

5 Digital Health Trends You'll See in 2015

December 16, 2014 10:27 am | by Leyl Master Black, Mashable | News | Comments

2014 has been a huge year for health tech. According to digital health incubator StartUp Health, digital health funding in the first three quarters of 2014 has already surpassed $5 billion, close to double what was invested in all of 2013 ($2.8 billion). "Digital health funding for the year is on track to double last year's ... 

Student Seeks to Harness the Power of the Immune System to Combat Cancer

December 16, 2014 10:04 am | by Jessica Fujimori, MIT News Correspondent | News | Comments

When Elliot Akama-Garren was in high school and tried to envision his future, his path was by no means clear to him. “Growing up, I was interested in nearly every subject,” he says. “I could see myself becoming a historian, a journalist, a scientist, a physicist, or a chemist,” he says ... 

Remote Control Targets without Wires, Implants, or Drugs

December 16, 2014 9:58 am | by Zach Veilleux, Rockefeller University | News | Comments

A team at Rockefeller University and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute is developing a system that would make it possible to remotely control biological targets in living animals -- rapidly, without wires, implants or drugs ...                  

HotSpot Episode 93: Stuffing Bras with Actuators and Sensing Tech

December 15, 2014 12:30 pm | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development | Videos | Comments

This week on WDD’s HotSpot, researchers are stuffing bras with actuators and sensing technologies; Berkeley engineers are building organic optoelectronic sensors that can be slapped on like a Band-Aid; Wii’s are rehabbing stroke survivors; and a new technology is significantly lowering UAV costs ... 

ElectRx Has the Nerve to Envision Revolutionary Therapies for Self-Healing

December 12, 2014 11:36 am | by DARPA | News | Comments

DARPA’s Electrical Prescriptions (ElectRx) program is seeking innovative research proposals to help transform neuromodulation therapies from last resort to first choice for a wide range of diseases ...                      

Nintendo Wii Helps Stroke Victims with Physiotherapy

December 12, 2014 10:51 am | by Lancaster University | News | Comments

Stroke survivors can have “significant” improvement in arm movements after using the Nintendo Wii as physiotherapy according to researchers ...                                                 

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