Advertisement
Medical
Subscribe to Medical
View Sample

FREE WDD Email Newsletter

HotSpot Episode 50: Blinking Beacons Help Planes Miss Wind Turbines

February 18, 2014 10:54 am | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development | Videos | Comments

This week on WDD's HotSpot, a low-power, signal-processing chip that could lead to a chochlear implant with not external hardware; synthetic motors that live inside human cells; a sensor solution for blinking beacons on wind turbines; and a clever detector array...                    

Miami Hotels Use Technology to Help Sick Guests

February 13, 2014 5:16 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Some Miami hotels are teaming up with a program to offer out-of-town guests who are feeling under the weather a convenient way to hook up with a doctor. If travelers are suffering from anything from an earache to the flu, they can contact the hotel concierge or front desk to coordinate a new medical technology platform.

First 3-D Movies of Living Sperm

February 12, 2014 10:16 am | by The Optical Society | News | Comments

To improve their chances of success, in vitro fertilization clinics need to assess the viability of the sperm they use. Now doctors may soon have a new technique to help them sort the good sperm cells from the less viable ones: a tracking system that takes 3-D movies of living sperm...

Advertisement

Design Prototype Chip Makes Possible a Fully Implantable Cochlear Implant

February 11, 2014 10:36 am | by Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary | News | Comments

Researchers from Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Harvard Medical School, and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have designed a prototype system-on-chip (SoC) that could make possible a fully implanted cochlear implant. They will present their findings on Feb. 11at the IEEE International Solid State Circuits Conference in San Francisco...

Chips That Listen to Bacteria

February 11, 2014 10:05 am | by Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science | News | Comments

A research team has demonstrated that integrated circuit technology, the basis of modern computers and communications devices, can be used for a most unusual application—the study of signaling in bacterial colonies. They have developed a chip based on complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology...

Cochlear Implants with No Exterior Hardware

February 10, 2014 9:28 am | by Massachusetts Institute of Technology | News | Comments

Cochlear implants — medical devices that electrically stimulate the auditory nerve — have granted at least limited hearing to hundreds of thousands of people worldwide who otherwise would be totally deaf. Existing versions of the device, however, require that a disk-shaped transmitter about an inch in diameter be affixed to the skull...

Step to Artificial Hand That Feels What You Touch

February 6, 2014 9:49 am | by LAURAN NEERGAARD, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

It's not quite the bionics of science fiction, but European researchers have created a robotic hand that gave an amputee a sense of touch he hadn't felt in a decade. The experiment lasted only a week, but it let the patient feel if different objects — a bottle, a baseball, some cotton, a mandarin orange — were hard or soft, slim or round, and intuitively adjust his grasp...

Electronically Controlled Drugs Could Minimize Side Effects

February 6, 2014 9:34 am | by American Chemical Society | News | Comments

Potential side effects of many of today's therapeutic drugs can be downright frightening — just listen carefully to a drug commercial on TV. These effects often occur when a drug is active throughout the body, not just where and when it is needed. But scientists are reporting progress on a new tailored approach to deliver medicine in a much more targeted way...

Advertisement

HotSpot Episode 48: High-Tech Bra Tracks True Love

February 3, 2014 9:57 am | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development | Videos | Comments

This week on WDD's HotSpot, an electronic, beer-tasting tongue; a high-tech bra that only opens for true love; smart shorts that tracks how you're working your muscles; and bionic contact lens that produce tactile sensations to help guide the blind...                       

Engineering Newswire 75: First Porsche Ever Made Found 115 Years Later

January 31, 2014 8:08 am | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development | Videos | Comments

Today on Engineering Newswire, we’re printing multi-material in color, detecting mines with our shoes, cutting catalytic converter costs, and riding the first Porsche ever made. This episode features ...                      

Self-Aligning DNA Wires for Application in Nanoelectronics

January 30, 2014 3:45 pm | by Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf | News | Comments

Since continuous miniaturization in microelectronics is already starting to reach the physical limits, researchers are seeking new methods for device fabrication. One promising candidate is the DNA origami technique in which individual strands of the biomolecule self-assemble into arbitrarily shaped nanostructures...

Nintendo Chief Stays On, Health Business Planned

January 30, 2014 10:47 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Nintendo has been unable to arrest a slide in console sales as more people play games on smartphones and tablets. The company's apparent solution? A move into health care. Nintendo president Satoru Iwata vowed Thursday to stick to the company's old ways, refused to resign or cut product prices despite its dismal earnings...

Photos of the Day: Surgeons Implant First 'Bionic Eye'

January 30, 2014 9:59 am | by University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center | News | Comments

Retina surgeons at the University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center have performed the first — and second — surgeries in the United States to implant an artificial retina, or “bionic eye,” since the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the device last year. The surgeries were performed on patients with retinitis pigmentosa...

Advertisement

First 'Bionic Eye' Retinal Prosthesis Implanted

January 30, 2014 9:23 am | by University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center | News | Comments

Retina surgeons at the University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center have performed the first — and second — surgeries in the United States to implant an artificial retina, or “bionic eye,” since the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the device last year. The surgeries were performed on patients with retinitis pigmentosa...

HotSpot Episode 47: Having Sex with Glass

January 27, 2014 10:35 am | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development | Videos | Comments

This week on WDD's HotSpot, a solution for gamer rage; a control system that makes robots more intelligent; spicing things up with Google Glass; and a Wi-Fi product that allows users to control any device from their smartphone...                   

Live Feed into Our Bodies

January 27, 2014 9:21 am | by Sonia Fernandez, University of Santa Barbara, California | News | Comments

A device that can monitor the levels of specific drugs as they flow through the bloodstream may soon take the guesswork out of drug dosing and allow physicians to tailor prescriptions to their patients’ specific biology. Developed by UC Santa Barbara researchers...                  

Near Error-Free Wireless Detection Made Possible

January 24, 2014 9:46 am | by Sarah Collins, University of Cambridge | News | Comments

The accuracy and range of radio frequency identification (RFID) systems, which are used in everything from passports to luggage tracking, could be vastly improved thanks to a new system developed by researchers at the University of Cambridge...                          

Strengthening the Electrotechnical Sector by Participating in IEC Standardization

January 20, 2014 3:32 pm | by S. Joe Bhatia, President & CEO American National Standards Institute | Blogs | Comments

Nearly every aspect of modern life is connected to the electrotechnical industry. From telecommunications, multimedia, medical equipment, and energy production and distribution, to e-mobility, fiber optics, nanotechnology, and consumer ...

Hotspot Episode 46: Robot-Controlled Sperm: The Future of Fertilization

January 20, 2014 11:49 am | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development | Videos | Comments

This week on WDD's HotSpot, LG is taking advantage of Natural Language Processing to allow customers to communicate with their appliances; a micro-windmill has been designed to generate wind energy that could potentially charge cell phones; "spermbots" made up of live sperm cells in little tubes that can be magnetically controlled; and 5,000 bees in Australia are being tagged with tiny RFID sensors...    

CEA Joins Industry Groups in Sponsoring Educational Series

January 17, 2014 10:20 am | by Consumer Electronics Association | News | Comments

ArlThe Consumer Electronics Association (CEA) has announced its sponsorship of an educational program series called the “Mobile Medical Apps (MMA) Roadshow: Managing App Development under FDA Regulation,” joining a consortium of six leading universities, more than a dozen industry trade...            

Google Contact Lens Could Be Option for Diabetics

January 17, 2014 10:04 am | by MARTHA MENDOZA, AP National Writer | News | Comments

Brian Otis gingerly holds what looks like a typical contact lens on his index finger. Look closer. Sandwiched in this lens are two twinkling glitter-specks loaded with tens of thousands of miniaturized transistors...                  

Photos of the Day: Contact Lens for Diabetics

January 17, 2014 10:03 am | by MARTHA MENDOZA, AP National Writer | News | Comments

Researchers also had to build in a system to pull energy from incoming radio frequency waves to power the device enough to collect and transmit one glucose reading per second. The embedded electronics in the lens don't obscure vision because they lie outside the eye's pupil and iris...            

CES 2014: The Weird, Strange, and Unique

January 15, 2014 2:53 pm | by Editor | Blogs | Comments

Every trade show has these — the oddball products, tech demos, and general weirdness that accompanies any large gathering of people vying for your attention. Sometimes, the exhibits exude innovation and leave a positive lasting impression...        

HotSpot Episode 45: Augmented Reality Helmets Make Motorcycles Safer

January 13, 2014 10:38 am | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development | Videos | Comments

This week on WDD's HotSpot, another mother to tell you what to do; shrinking digital storage; capturing any color on any surface; and motorcycle helmets that creat an augmented reality...                                              

Tweaking MRI to Track Creatine May Spot Heart Problems Earlier

January 13, 2014 10:01 am | by Steve Graff, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine | News | Comments

A new MRI method to map creatine at higher resolutions in the heart may help clinicians and scientists find abnormalities and disorders earlier than traditional diagnostic methods, researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania suggest in a new study published online today in Nature Medicine...                  

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading