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HotSpot Episode 66: Quantum Teleportation

June 9, 2014 9:54 am | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development | Videos | Comments

This week on WDD's HotSpot researchers successfully teleport quantum information; a new system that remotely senses objects across long distances; electronic medical devices that could replace pharmaceuticals; and a recap from IMS2014...                         

Rural Clinics Increasingly Turn to Telemedicine

June 9, 2014 9:50 am | by Regina Garcia Cano, Associated Press | News | Comments

Fifty years in farming had given Tom Soukup a few brushes with his own mortality, but after a cow pinned him against a wall, death felt closer than ever. He lay on the muddy ground and began to pray, every gasp feeling like a stab to the chest...

Can Virtual Reality Therapy Help Alleviate Chronic Pain?

June 5, 2014 8:54 pm | by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News | News | Comments

Chronic pain due to disease or injury is common, and even prescription pain medications cannot provide acceptable pain relief for many individuals. Virtual reality as a means of distraction, inducing positive emotions, or creating the perception...

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Making Artificial Vision Look More Natural

June 5, 2014 8:34 pm | by NIH/National Eye Institute | News | Comments

In laboratory tests, researchers have used electrical stimulation of retinal cells to produce the same patterns of activity that occur when the retina sees a moving object. Although more work remains, this is a step toward restoring natural, high-fidelity vision to blind people...

Design of Self-Assembling Protein Nanomachines Starts to Click

June 5, 2014 10:33 am | by University of Washington | News | Comments

A route for constructing protein nanomachines engineered for specific applications may be closer to reality. Biological systems produce an incredible array of self-assembling, functional protein tools. Some examples of these nanoscale protein materials...

Prototype Electrolyte Sensor to Provide Immediate Read-Outs

June 3, 2014 9:55 pm | by DOE/Sandia National Laboratories | News | Comments

Patients trying to navigate today's complex medical system with its costly laboratory analyses might prefer a pain-free home diagnostic device, worn on the wrist, that can analyze, continuously record and immediately remedy low electrolyte levels...

Apple Expands into Health, Home with New Software

June 3, 2014 9:42 pm | by Michael Liedtke, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

Apple is expanding into home and health management as the company tries to turn its iPhones, iPads and Mac computers into an interchangeable network of devices that serve as a hub of people's increasingly digital lives. The new tools for tracking health and controlling household...

Lasers and Night-Vision Help Improve Medical Imaging

June 3, 2014 9:19 pm | by The Optical Society | News | Comments

The human lymphatic system is an important but poorly understood circulatory system consisting of tiny vessels spread throughout the body. This “drainage” network helps guard against infections and prevents swelling, which occasionally happens when disease...

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Samsung Envisions Wearables Using Common System

May 29, 2014 12:32 am | by Anick Jesdanun, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

Health sensors and devices can get better if rival companies work together, Samsung executives said Wednesday.The South Korean company pushed for a common system so that different manufacturers — from startups to established companies...

Photos of the Day: SEAS Develops Innovative Medical Devices

May 27, 2014 9:01 pm | by Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences | News | Comments

Removing a malignant tumor from the head of the pancreas is a risky and demanding operation. The surgeon must carefully navigate around the stomach, the gallbladder, the bile duct, lymph nodes, and several high-pressure blood vessels. But an inexpensive device designed by Harvard engineering students...

Medical Mechanics

May 27, 2014 8:52 pm | by Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences | News | Comments

Removing a malignant tumor from the head of the pancreas is a risky and demanding operation. The surgeon must carefully navigate around the stomach, the gallbladder, the bile duct, lymph nodes, and several high-pressure blood vessels. But an inexpensive device designed by Harvard engineering students...

New Sensor Could Light the Way Forward in Low-Cost Medical Imaging

May 23, 2014 11:40 am | by University of Surrey | News | Comments

New research published today in Nature's Scientific Reports, identifies a new type of light sensor that could allow medical and security imaging, via low cost cameras. The team of researchers from the University of Surrey have developed a new 'multispectral' light sensor that detects the full spectrum of light...

Honeywell Introduces Nanopower Anisotropic Magnetoresistive Sensor Integrated Circuits

May 22, 2014 10:50 am | by WDD Staff | Product Releases | Comments

Honeywell has introduced the industry’s first Nanopower Anisotropic Magnetoresistive Sensor ICs that provide the highest level of magnetic sensitivity (as low as 7 Gauss typical) while requiring nanopower (360 nA)...

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'Electroceutical' Devices Treat Illness, Alleviate Pain

May 22, 2014 10:48 am | by Stanford University | Videos | Comments

A Stanford electrical engineer has invented a way to wirelessly transfer power deep inside the body, and then use this power to run tiny electronic medical gadgets such as pacemakers, nerve stimulators or new sensors and devices yet to be developed. The discoveries reported May 19 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences...

Engineer Invents Safe Way to Transfer Energy to Medical Chips in the Body

May 22, 2014 10:38 am | by Stanford University | News | Comments

A Stanford electrical engineer has invented a way to wirelessly transfer power deep inside the body, and then use this power to run tiny electronic medical gadgets such as pacemakers, nerve stimulators or new sensors and devices yet to be developed. The discoveries reported May 19 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences...

Meaghan's Minute: Wirelessly Charged Implants

May 22, 2014 9:51 am | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development | Videos | Comments

Today on Meaghan's Minute, brought to you by Memory Protection Devices, researchers at Stanford University have developed a wireless system that uses the same power as a cell phone to safely transmit energy to chips the size of a grain of rice; paving the way for new "electroceutical"...               

Retinal Scanner that Fits in a Purse

May 21, 2014 11:59 pm | by Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft | News | Comments

The retina lets us see. However, it also reveals who we are. The blood vessel pattern of the retina is a biometric feature that is different in each human being. Using special eye scanners, a person could give proof of identity safely, securely and unambiguously while on the go. For example, in order to conduct bank transactions...

Pulsed Electrical Fields Destroy Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

May 21, 2014 11:38 pm | by Massachusetts General Hospital | News | Comments

Application of a technology currently used to disinfect food products may help to get around one of the most challenging problems in medicine today, the proliferation of bacteria resistant to antibiotics and other antimicrobial drugs. In a paper appearing in the June issue of the journal...

Photo of the Day: Optical Brain Scanner Goes Where Other Brain Scanners Can't

May 20, 2014 10:38 am | by Washington University School of Medicine | News | Comments

Scientists have advanced a brain-scanning technology that tracks what the brain is doing by shining dozens of tiny LED lights on the head. This new generation of neuroimaging compares favorably to other approaches but avoids the radiation exposure and bulky magnets...

DOT Heralds New Generation of Neuroimaging

May 20, 2014 10:27 am | by Washington University School of Medicine | News | Comments

Scientists have advanced a brain-scanning technology that tracks what the brain is doing by shining dozens of tiny LED lights on the head. This new generation of neuroimaging compares favorably to other approaches but avoids the radiation exposure and bulky magnets...

New 'T-Ray' Tech Converts Light to Sound

May 19, 2014 3:07 pm | by University of Michigan | News | Comments

A device that essentially listens for light waves could help open up the last frontier of the electromagnetic spectrum—the terahertz range. So-called T-rays, which are light waves too long for human eyes to see, could help airport security guards find chemical and other weapons...

Phase Contrast Improves Mammography

May 16, 2014 9:55 am | by ETH Zurich | News | Comments

Phase contrast X-ray imaging has enabled researchers at ETH Zurich, the Paul Scherrer Institute and the Kantonsspital Baden to perform mammographic imaging that allows greater precision in the assessment of breast cancer and its precursors...

Engineering Newswire 90: Hands-Free Corvette on Air Force Test Track

May 15, 2014 5:30 pm | by Alex Shanahan, Multimedia Production Specialist | Videos | Comments

Today on Engineering Newswire we’re refitting unmanned helicopters, marveling at DEKA’s new prosthetic arm, and driving a Corvette racecar hands-free... Former Indie League racer, Sam Schmidt, got back behind the wheel to race a Corvette...

New Implanted Devices May Reshape Medicine

May 13, 2014 3:10 pm | by University of Texas at Dallas | News | Comments

Researchers from The University of Texas at Dallas and the University of Tokyo have created electronic devices that become soft when implanted inside the body and can deploy to grip 3-D objects, such as large tissues, nerves and blood vessels. These biologically adaptive, flexible transistors...

LPRS Introduces IoT Low Power Consumption Integrated Wireless Controller

May 13, 2014 9:59 am | by WDD Staff | Product Releases | Comments

LPRS (UK) now offers Internet of Things (IoT) system builders a system-on-chip fully integrated wireless controller suitable for remote, battery powered sensor systems, which can offer current consumption as low as 32 µA...

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