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Giant Atom Smasher Starts Up after 2-Year Shutdown

April 6, 2015 9:46 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

The world's biggest particle accelerator is back in action after a two-year shutdown and upgrade, embarking on a new mission that scientists hope could give them a look into the unseen dark universe ...

Smart Wallet Buzzes When Lost

April 2, 2015 2:44 pm | by Megan Crouse, Real Time Digital Reporter, Design Group | Articles | Comments

Losing one’s wallet is a common fear in the modern world, but with a new product currently up on Kickstarter your phone will be able to track your wallet – as long as they’re not both lost in the same place ...

Sensors Key to Preserving Battlefield Edge

April 2, 2015 1:56 pm | by David Vergun, U.S. Army | News | Comments

While modernization programs across the Department of Defense have shrunk, science and technology involving sensors and other capabilities has not - at least not yet, Dr. Mike Grove said. The reason for that support is that sensors are ...

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AI is Learning to See the Forest in Spite of the Trees

April 2, 2015 1:48 pm | by Big Think | Videos | Comments

Stefan Weitz, Microsoft's Director of Search, explains that the future of machine learning consists of teaching artificial intelligence to identify patterns. This will allow, for instance, a search engine to ...

Do Girls Like Math?

April 2, 2015 12:17 pm | by National Science Foundation | News | Comments

This is a test: Where are the highest proportions of women working in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM): in affluent industrialized countries, or in less affluent, less economically developed countries ...

Photos of the Day: Quantum Teleportation on a Chip

April 2, 2015 12:15 pm | by Joanne Fryer, University of Bristol | News | Comments

The core circuits of quantum teleportation, which generate and detect quantum entanglement, have been successfully integrated into a photonic chip by an international team of scientists from the universities of Bristol, Tokyo, Southampton and NTT Device Technology Laboratories. These results pave the way to developing ultra-high-speed quantum computers and strengthening the security of communication ...

Diagnosing Disease with a Smartphone

April 2, 2015 11:03 am | by Florida Atlantic University | News | Comments

In much the same way that glucometers and pregnancy tests have revolutionized in-home diagnostic testing, researchers from Florida Atlantic University and collaborators have identified a new biosensing platform that could be used to remotely detect and determine treatment options for HIV, E-coli, Staphylococcus aureas and other bacteria ...

Keeping Engineers Better Informed

April 2, 2015 10:46 am | by David Mantey, Editorial Director, @djamesmanny | Blogs | Comments

I wanted to reach out and share some of the new things that we’re doing in Advantage Business Media’s Design Engineering Group to make sure that you are the industry’s most informed design engineers at every stage of the development process ...

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Parkinson's Diagnosis by Typing on a Keyboard

April 2, 2015 10:43 am | by Melanie Gonick/MIT | Videos | Comments

Using the researchers' algorithm for analyzing keystroke patterns could lead to the diagnosis of diseases that impair motor function, such as Parkinson's disease, much earlier than is now possible ...

Typing Patterns Help to Identify Early Onset of Parkinson’s

April 2, 2015 10:40 am | by Anne Trafton, MIT News Office | News | Comments

In a paper appearing in Scientific Reports, the researchers found that their algorithm for analyzing keystrokes could distinguish between typing done in the middle of the night, when sleep deprivation impairs motor skills, and typing performed when fully rested ...

Battery Energy Storage Project shows Promise for Electricity Network

April 2, 2015 10:30 am | by Michael Jacobson, Griffith University | News | Comments

According to the research from Griffith's School of Engineering and published in the journal Applied Energy, a forecast-based, three-phase battery energy storage scheduling and operation system provides benefits such as reduced peak demand, more efficient load balancing and better management of supply from solar photovoltaics (PV) ...

Stock Split could Cost Google over $500 Million

April 2, 2015 10:27 am | by MICHAEL LIEDTKE, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

An unorthodox stock split designed to ensure Google CEO Larry Page and fellow co-founder Sergey Brin retain control of the Internet's most profitable company could cost Google more than half a billion dollars ...

Researchers Build Brain-Machine Interface to Control Prosthetic Hand

April 1, 2015 10:37 am | by Jeannie Kever, University of Houston | News | Comments

A research team from the University of Houston has created an algorithm that allowed a man to grasp a bottle and other objects with a prosthetic hand, powered only by his thoughts ...

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Using Sonar to Navigate the World

April 1, 2015 10:29 am | by Daniel Kish, TED Talk | Videos | Comments

Daniel Kish has been blind since he was 13 months old, but has learned to “see” using a form of echolocation. He clicks his tongue and sends out flashes of sound that bounce off surfaces in the environment and return to him, helping him to construct an understanding of the space around him. In a rousing talk, Kish demonstrates how this works ...

A New Spin on Navigation

April 1, 2015 10:21 am | by Kelly Mack, The Optical Society | News | Comments

A pair of light waves - one zipping clockwise the other counterclockwise around a microscopic track - may hold the key to creating the world's smallest gyroscope: one a fraction of the width of a human hair. By bringing this essential technology down to an entirely new scale, a team of applied physicists hopes to enable a new generation of phenomenally compact gyroscope-based navigation systems, among other intriguing applications ...

Photos of the Day: Skin's Resistance to Tearing

April 1, 2015 10:14 am | by Lynn Yarris, DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

The mechanistic understanding identified in skin could be applied to the improvement of artificial skin, or to the development of thin film polymers for applications such as flexible electronics ...

Understanding Skin's Resistance to Tearing could Lead to Flexible Electronics

April 1, 2015 10:13 am | by Lynn Yarris, DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

When weighing the pluses and minuses of your skin add this to the plus column: Your skin - like that of all vertebrates - is remarkably resistant to tearing. Now, a collaboration of researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the University of California (UC) San Diego has shown why ...

RC Aircraft or Drones?

March 31, 2015 11:40 am | by Viet Nguyen, Senior Software Engineer, Intel Corporation | Articles | Comments

RC Aircraft have been around since before World War II. This popular hobby evolved in the last decades, but essentially is based on a flying model, mostly aircraft or helicopter, and a radio transmitter to control it. The range of these transmitters varies from 1 to 2 miles, even though the RC pilot couldn’t fly any farther than his/her visual range in order to control the aircraft ...

Sex Bias Case Will Embolden Women Despite Verdict

March 31, 2015 9:17 am | by Sudhin Thanawala, Associated Press | News | Comments

Observers say a long legal battle over accusations that a prominent Silicon Valley venture capital firm demeaned women and held them to a different standard than their male colleagues will embolden women in the industry and lead firms ...

Better Traffic Signals Can Cut Greenhouse Gas Emissions

March 31, 2015 9:10 am | by David L. Chandler, MIT News Office | News | Comments

Sitting in traffic during rush hour is not just frustrating for drivers; it also adds unnecessary greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere. Now a study by researchers at MIT could lead to better ways of programming a city’s stoplights to reduce delays, improve efficiency, and reduce emissions ...

Wearable Technology that Helps with Public Speaking

March 31, 2015 8:58 am | by Leonor Sierra, University of Rochester | News | Comments

Speaking in public is the top fear for many people. Now, researchers from the Human-Computer Interaction Group at the University of Rochester have developed an intelligent user interface for "smart glasses" that gives real-time feedback to the speaker on volume modulation and speaking rate, while being minimally distracting ...

Photo of the Day: Bendable Digital Displays

March 30, 2015 4:23 pm | by George Hunka, American Friends of Tel Aviv University | News | Comments

From smartphones and tablets to computer monitors and interactive TV screens, electronic displays are everywhere. As the demand for instant, constant communication grows, so too does the urgency for more convenient portable devices — especially devices, like computer displays, that can be easily rolled up and put away, rather than requiring a flat surface for storage and transportation ...

Ambitious Women Have Flat Heads

March 30, 2015 1:22 pm | by Dame Stephanie Shirley, TED Talk | Videos | Comments

Dame Stephanie Shirley is the most successful tech entrepreneur you never heard of. In the 1960s, she founded a pioneering all-woman software company in the UK, which was ultimately valued at $3 billion, making millionaires of 70 of her team members. In this frank and often hilarious talk, she explains why she went by “Steve,” how she upended the expectations of the time, and shares some sure-fire ways to identify ambitious women …

Expanding the Capacity of Fiber Optics

March 30, 2015 12:51 pm | by Tom Abate, Stanford Engineering | News | Comments

Internet data travels on a laser beam through a fiber optic cable as thin as a human hair. Marvelous as that is, it may not be enough – as the volume of data grows, some researchers are asking, why waste an entire fiber on just a single beam of light? ...

Shape-Shifting Sensor Reports Conditions from Deep in the Body

March 30, 2015 10:55 am | by Michael Baum, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) | News | Comments

Scientists working at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have devised and demonstrated a new, shape-shifting probe, about one-hundredth as wide as a human hair, which is capable of sensitive, high-resolution remote biological sensing that is not possible with current technology ...

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