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Acoustic Cloaking Device Hides Objects from Sound

March 11, 2014 8:10 pm | by Duke University | News | Comments

Using little more than a few perforated sheets of plastic and a staggering amount of number crunching, Duke engineers have demonstrated the world’s first three-dimensional acoustic cloak. The new device reroutes sound waves to create the impression that both the cloak and anything beneath it are not there...

Bending the Light with a Tiny Chip

March 11, 2014 8:04 pm | by California Institute of Technology | News | Comments

A silicon chip developed by Caltech researchers acts as a lens-free projector--and could one day end up in your cell phone. Imagine that you are in a meeting with coworkers or at a gathering of friends. You pull out your cell phone to show a presentation or a video on YouTube...

Getting Hyperspectral Image Data Down to a Sprint

March 11, 2014 7:55 pm | by Fraunhofer | News | Comments

Materials of similar appearance can be unambiguously identified by the respective color spectrum. Hyperspectral cameras deliver the requisite spectral data. A new software product can process these vast amounts of data in real time. Cameras with hyperspectral sensors can observe far more than the human eye...

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LED Lamps: Less Energy, More Light

March 11, 2014 7:45 pm | by Fraunhofer | News | Comments

LEDs are durable and save energy. Now researchers have found a way to make LED lamps even more compact while supplying more light than commercially available models. The key to success: transistors made of the semiconductor material gallium nitride...

Metallurgical Challenges in Microelectronic 3D IC Packaging Technology

March 11, 2014 7:31 pm | by Science China Press | News | Comments

Mobile hand-held consumer electronic products have a rapid growing market today, witnessed by the popularity of Apple products. Most people make their first contact to internet, not by a PC, rather by a smart phone. The phone is no longer a phone, but it provides various functions...

California Mulls How to Regulate 'Driverless Cars'

March 11, 2014 12:29 pm | by Justin Pritchard, Associated Press | News | Comments

California's Department of Motor Vehicles is wading into the complex question of how to regulate the use of cars that rely on computers — not people — to drive them. Once the stuff of science fiction, "Driverless cars." On Tuesday, the DMV is hearing ideas on how to integrate the cars onto public roads...

Rubio: U.S. Bandwidth Better Used by Cell Providers

March 11, 2014 10:33 am | by Philip Elliott, Associated Press | News | Comments

Pitching himself as an ally to Silicon Valley, presidential hopeful Sen. Marco Rubio proposed giving cellphone companies more access to government-controlled airwaves as part of a package of pro-business initiatives he said would create "thousands upon thousands of high-paying jobs..."

SA Leaker Snowden Says Has No Regrets for Leaks

March 11, 2014 10:24 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden says he has no regrets about revealing the agency's mass surveillance program. Snowden spoke Monday via live video conference to a packed audience at the South By Southwest Interactive Festival...

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South By Southwest: Secrets, Spying, Chef Watson

March 11, 2014 10:15 am | by Barbara Ortutay, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

FOMO —or the fear of missing out— is a common complaint at the South By Southwest Interactive festival in Austin, Texas each year. It's here, after all, that "Girls" creator Lena Dunham spoke on Monday at the same time that NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden gave a teleconferenced talk...

Photos of the Day: Drone Development Restricted

March 11, 2014 10:04 am | by Michelle L. Price, Associated Press | News | Comments

Law enforcement, government agencies and others are itching to use drones for everything from finding lost hikers to tracking shifting wildfires. But privacy watchdogs are urging state legislatures to step in and head off any potential privacy violations...

States Wrestle with Developing, Restricting Drones

March 11, 2014 9:49 am | by Michelle L. Price, Associated Press | News | Comments

Law enforcement, government agencies and others are itching to use drones for everything from finding lost hikers to tracking shifting wildfires. But privacy watchdogs are urging state legislatures to step in and head off any potential privacy violations...

Thinnest-Possible LEDs to be Stronger, More Energy Efficient

March 10, 2014 3:51 pm | by University of Washington | News | Comments

Most modern electronics, from flat-screen TVs and smartphones to wearable technologies and computer monitors, use tiny light-emitting diodes, or LEDs. These LEDs are based off of semiconductors that emit light with the movement of electrons. As devices get smaller and faster, there is more demand for such semiconductors that are tinier, stronger and more energy efficient...

2D Material Shows Promise for Optoelectronics

March 10, 2014 11:36 am | by Massachusetts Institute of Technology | News | Comments

A team of MIT researchers has used a novel material that's just a few atoms thick to create devices that can harness or emit light. This proof-of-concept could lead to ultrathin, lightweight, and flexible photovoltaic cells, LEDs, and other optoelectronic devices, they say...

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Blind Can 'Hear' Colors and Shapes

March 10, 2014 11:28 am | by The Hebrew University of Jerusalem | News | Comments

What if you could "hear" colors? Or shapes? These features are normally perceived visually, but using sensory substitution devices (SSDs) they can now be conveyed to the brain noninvasively through other senses. At the Center for Human Perception and Cognition, the blind and visually impaired are being offered tools...

Snowden, Assange Top Bill at Texas Tech Gathering

March 10, 2014 11:17 am | by Barbara Ortutay, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

Surveillance. Online privacy. Robots. Food processing. Wearable computers. To get a sense of what's on the minds of the tech industry's thinkers, leaders and tinkerers, it's a good idea to head to Austin, Texas, rather than Silicon Valley this time of the year...

Stanford Engineers Create a Software Tool to Reduce the Cost of Cloud Computing

March 10, 2014 10:28 am | by Tom Abate, Stanford Engineering | News | Comments

We hear a lot about the future of computing in the cloud but not much about the efficiency of data centers, those facilities where clusters of server computers work together to host applications ranging from social networks to big data analytics...                      

Silicon Valley Women Star in Video Series Urging Young Women to Study Computing

March 10, 2014 10:07 am | by Tom Abate and Priya Ganesan, Stanford Engineering | News | Comments

Many people talk about encouraging young women to study computer science. Now some female undergraduates at Stanford hope to do just that by starting an online video library that features motivational interviews with Silicon Valley women in computing...                   

Photos of the Day: World's Thinnest, Most Flexible Solar Cells

March 10, 2014 9:57 am | by Vienna University of Technology | News | Comments

It does not get any thinner than this: The novel material graphene consists of only one atomic layer of carbon atoms and exhibits very special electronic properties. As it turns out, there are other materials too, which can open up intriguing new technological possibilities if they are arranged in just one or very few atomic layers...

Atomically Thin Solar Cells

March 10, 2014 9:50 am | by Vienna University of Technology | News | Comments

It does not get any thinner than this: The novel material graphene consists of only one atomic layer of carbon atoms and exhibits very special electronic properties. As it turns out, there are other materials too, which can open up intriguing new technological possibilities if they are arranged in just one or very few atomic layers...

A Timeline of GPS Technology

March 7, 2014 4:28 pm | by Robert J. Hall, Track Your Truck | Blogs | Comments

As we tool around the countryside under the direction of that helpful box on the dashboard, it's easy to believe that GPS is the latest and greatest invention to hit the pike. It may come as a surprise to learn that the idea actually got off to its rocky start back in 1959...

Why GPS Tracking Systems Need to be User-Friendly

March 7, 2014 4:23 pm | by Robert J. Hall, Track Your Truck | Blogs | Comments

Thanks to major advances in GPS technology over the last several years, it's easier and more affordable than ever for small fleets to invest in GPS tracking systems. Still, all tracking systems are not created equal. Without doing a little homework prior to making such a purchase...

Wireless Energy Harvesting to Power the Internet of Things

March 7, 2014 3:59 pm | by Marlee Rosen, Principal Analyst, Rosen Associates | Articles | Comments

Internet technology will move from being something that is kind of independent of us to something that is literally woven into our daily existence. From your shoes to your shirt, stove to your toilet, the future may be found in connecting every part of our lives...

Software Analyzes Apps for Malicious Behavior

March 7, 2014 3:39 pm | by Saarland University | News | Comments

Last year at the end of July the Russian software company "Doctor Web" detected several malicious apps in the app store "Google Play." Downloaded on a smartphone, the malware installed — without the permission of the user — additional programs which sent expensive text messages to premium services...

Squeezing Light into Metals

March 7, 2014 3:16 pm | by University of Utah | News | Comments

Using an inexpensive inkjet printer, electrical engineers produced microscopic structures that use light in metals to carry information. This new technique, which controls electrical conductivity within such microstructures, could be used to rapidly fabricate superfast components in electronic devices, make wireless technology faster or print magnetic materials...

Colored Diamonds are a Superconductor’s Best Friend

March 7, 2014 3:04 pm | by UC Berkeley | News | Comments

Flawed but colorful diamonds are among the most sensitive detectors of magnetic fields known today, allowing physicists to explore the minuscule magnetic fields in metals, exotic materials and even human tissue. Researchers have now shown that these diamond sensors can measure the tiny magnetic fields in high-temperature superconductors...

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