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Combining Computer Vision and Brain Computer Interface For Faster Mine Detection

May 5, 2015 9:06 am | by University of California - San Diego | News | Comments

Computer scientists at the University of California, San Diego, have combined sophisticated computer vision algorithms and a brain-computer interface to find mines in sonar images of the ocean floor. The study shows...

Summer Camps with a Mission: To Create Cybersecurity Experts

May 4, 2015 11:18 am | by Wilson Ring, Associated Press | News | Comments

At Vermont's Norwich University, 20 high school students will build computers they'll be able to...

Algorithm Combines Videos from Unstructured Camera Arrays into Panoramas

May 4, 2015 9:47 am | by Disney Research | News | Comments

Even non-professionals may someday be able to create high-quality video panoramas using multiple...

Engineering a Better Solar Cell

May 1, 2015 10:01 am | by University of Washington | News | Comments

One of the fastest-growing areas of solar energy research is with materials called perovskites....

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The Fearsome Foursome: Technologies Enable Ambitious MMS Mission

April 29, 2015 10:17 am | by NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center | News | Comments

It was unprecedented developing a mission that could fly four identically equipped spacecraft in a tight formation and take measurements 100 times faster than any previous space mission -- an achievement enabled in part by four NASA-developed technologies that in some ... 

Making Robots More Human

April 29, 2015 10:02 am | by American Chemical Society | News | Comments

Most people are naturally adept at reading facial expressions -- from smiling and frowning to brow-furrowing and eye-rolling -- to tell what others are feeling. Now scientists have developed ultra-sensitive, wearable sensors that can do the same thing. Their technology, reported ... 

New Computer-Based Vision Screening Test for Children

April 28, 2015 10:54 am | by Elsevier Health Sciences | News | Comments

Many eye disorders in young children are asymptomatic and may remain undetected without testing. Since effective treatments are available for many of those conditions, early identification and intervention are critical to prevent potentially permanent vision problems. A new report ... 

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Heat Makes Electrons' Spin in Magnetic Superconductors

April 28, 2015 10:34 am | by Academy of Finland | News | Comments

Physicists have shown how heat can be exploited for controlling magnetic properties of matter. The finding helps in the development of more efficient mass memories. The result was published yesterday in Physical Review Letters. The international research group ... 

Embracing the 5G Era

April 28, 2015 10:06 am | by Science China Press | News | Comments

To meet the demands of 2020, the 5G research has attracted global attention and made remarkable progress. 5G will be the first meaningful unified wideband mobile communication system. A recent research has systematically overviewed the latest progress on the 5G ... 

New Effort to Detect Life On Other Planets

April 28, 2015 9:45 am | by Bjorn Carey, Stanford News | News | Comments

The study of exoplanets – planets around other stars – is a relatively new field, but planet-hunting efforts have been prolific. The discovery of the first exoplanet around a star like our sun was made in 1995, and NASA's Kepler space telescope has detected more ... 

Wireless Minute: NailO Turns Your Fingernail Into a Tiny Trackpad

April 27, 2015 12:36 pm | by Jon Dipierro, Janine Mooney | Videos | Comments

Whenever I'm cooking, it's always difficult to actually prepare the meal, hold seven hundred things in your hand, and then flip the page on the recipe book to see what the next step is. The NailO wants to help. A team at the MIT Media Lab is developing a thumbnail-mounted ... 

Magnifying Vibrations in Bridges and Buildings

April 24, 2015 11:29 am | by Jennifer Chu, MIT News Office | News | Comments

To the naked eye, buildings and bridges appear fixed in place, unmoved by forces like wind and rain. But in fact, these large structures do experience imperceptibly small vibrations that, depending on their frequency, may indicate instability or structural damage. MIT researchers have now ... 

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4-D Printing is Taking 3-D Printing to an Entirely New Level

April 24, 2015 11:00 am | by ARC Center of Excellence for Electromaterials Science | News | Comments

4D printing is unfolding as technology that takes 3D printing to an entirely new level. The fourth dimension is time, shape shifting in fact, and the ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science (ACES) at the University of Wollongong is helping to set the pace ... 

Autonomous Driving: A Problem Solved?

April 24, 2015 9:45 am | by Melissa Fassbender, Editor, PDD, @melfass | Blogs | Comments

Musk once warned us that artificial intelligence is more dangerous than nuclear weapons – but he isn’t worried about autonomous cars. In fact, he believes that one day (in the distant future) lawmakers may make human-driven cars illegal because the "two-ton death ... 

Drexel Materials Scientists Putting a New Spin on Computing Memory

April 23, 2015 10:49 am | by Drexel University | News | Comments

Ever since computers have been small enough to be fixtures on desks and laps, their central processing has functioned something like an atomic Etch A Sketch, with electromagnetic fields pushing data bits into place to encode data. Unfortunately, the same drawbacks ... 

Cloud Security Reaches Silicon

April 23, 2015 10:23 am | by Larry Hardesty, MIT News Office | News | Comments

In the last 10 years, computer security researchers have shown that malicious hackers don’t need to see your data in order to steal your data. From the pattern in which your computer accesses its memory banks, adversaries can infer a shocking amount about ... 

Charged Holes in Graphene Increase Energy Storage Capacity

April 22, 2015 9:29 am | by University of California, San Diego | News | Comments

Engineers at the University of California, San Diego have discovered a method to increase the amount of electric charge that can be stored in graphene, a two-dimensional form of carbon. The research, published recently online in the journal Nano Letters, may provide a better ... 

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Stanford Team Makes Biotechnology Interactive with Games and Remote-Control Labs

April 21, 2015 10:39 am | by Stanford School of Engineering | News | Comments

In the 1950s computers were giant machines that filled buildings and served a variety of arcane functions. Today they fit into our pockets or backpacks, and help us work, communicate and play. "Biotechnology today it is very similar to where computing technology used ... 

New Tabletop Detector “Sees” Single Electrons

April 21, 2015 10:06 am | by Jennifer Chu, MIT News Office | News | Comments

MIT physicists have developed a new tabletop particle detector that is able to identify single electrons in a radioactive gas. As the gas decays and gives off electrons, the detector uses a magnet to trap them in a magnetic bottle. A radio antenna then picks up very weak signals emitted ... 

Innovative Technology Boosts Wi-Fi Bandwidth Tenfold

April 20, 2015 4:53 pm | by Oregon State University | News | Comments

Researchers at Oregon State University have invented a new technology that can increase the bandwidth of WiFi systems by 10 times, using LED lights to transmit information. The technology could be integrated with existing WiFi systems to reduce bandwidth problems ... 

Google Shaking Up Search Recommendations on Smartphones

April 20, 2015 11:22 am | by Michael Liedtke, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

Google is about to change the way its influential search engine recommends websites on smartphones in a shift that's expected to sway where millions of people shop, eat and find information. The revised formula, scheduled to be released Tuesday, will favor websites ... 

Advances in Molecular Electronics: Lights On — Molecule On

April 20, 2015 11:04 am | by Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf | News | Comments

Scientists at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) and the University of Konstanz are working on storing and processing information on the level of single molecules to create the smallest possible components that will combine autonomously to form ...

Technology Transfers Human Emotions to Your Palm Through Air

April 20, 2015 10:36 am | by University of Sussex | News | Comments

Human emotion can be transferred by technology that stimulates different parts of the hand without making physical contact with your body, a University of Sussex-led study has shown. Sussex scientist Dr Marianna Obrist, Lecturer at the Department of Informatics, has pinpointed ... 

HotSpot Episode 110: Sensor Can Detect Spoiled Meat

April 20, 2015 9:08 am | by Eric Sorensen, Jon Dipierro, Janine E. Mooney | Videos | Comments

This week on WDD's HotSpot, the Swimmo smartwatch and personal underwater swimming coach; the new Jawbone UP4 partners with American Express to bring mobile payments to the fitness band; scientists at The Ohio State University developed a prototype treadmill that adjusts its own speed; and MIT chemists developed a sensor that can detect spoiled meat ... 

Photo of the Day: Passive UHF RFID Tags Detect How People Interact with Objects

April 17, 2015 1:29 pm | by Disney Research | News | Comments

Disney Research has demonstrated that battery-free, radio frequency identification (RFID) tags can be used to cheaply and unobtrusively determine how people use and interact with daily objects, enabling new types of interactive play, smart homes and work environments, and new ... 

Beyond the Lithium Ion — A Significant Step Toward a Better Performing Battery

April 17, 2015 1:04 pm | by University of Illinois at Chicago | News | Comments

The race is on around the world as scientists strive to develop a new generation of batteries that can perform beyond the limits of the current lithium-ion based battery. Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have taken a significant step toward the development ... 

How Robots Can Help Build Better Doctors

April 16, 2015 10:36 am | by National Science Foundation | News | Comments

A young doctor leans over a patient who has been in a serious car accident and invariably must be experiencing pain. The doctor's trauma team examines the patient's pelvis and rolls her onto her side to check her spine. They scan the patient's abdomen with a rapid ultrasound ... 

MIT Sensor Detects Spoiled Meat

April 15, 2015 9:28 am | by Anne Trafton, MIT News Office | News | Comments

MIT chemists have devised an inexpensive, portable sensor that can detect gases emitted by rotting meat, allowing consumers to determine whether the meat in their grocery store or refrigerator is safe to eat. The sensor, which consists of chemically modified carbon ... 

A Camera That Powers Itself

April 15, 2015 9:22 am | by Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science | News | Comments

A research team led by Shree K. Nayar, T.C. Chang Professor of Computer Science at Columbia Engineering, has invented a prototype video camera that is the first to be fully self-powered--it can produce an image each second, indefinitely, of a well-lit indoor scene. They designed ... 

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