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Company Takes Antenna-Less Technology to New Levels

Thu, 04/15/2010 - 5:08am
The MAGICSTRAP® LXMS series, available from Murata Electronics North America, is the world's smallest UHF Gen 2 tag antenna-less tag. With two versions measuring just 3.2mm x 1.6mm x 0.55mm and 1.6mm x 1.0mm x 0.27mm, its small size and advanced functionality provide customers a complete miniature RFID tag that readily integrates into any item.

Further, the series allows for the easy addition and updating of information wirelessly using a UHF reader-writer. With an emphasis on its ease of application, the tags are provided on tape and real for standard pick and place equipment.

Murata's MAGICSTRAP® LXMS series tag is 50 times smaller than the UHF Gen 2 near-field tags currently available on the market because no antenna is necessary. Read range is typically between 3mm to 7mm, which opens up new opportunities for products to be tagged or embedded with RFID.

Other benefits include improved read speed, the allowance for password protected stored information and the ability to be integrated into most devices with minimal detection. The series is also resistant to extreme environmental conditions including high temperatures, humidity and the effects of chemicals. All of this ensures that durable goods can now be easily tagged for purposes of identification, tracking or information storage.

"This announcement underscores Murata's commitment to advancing antenna-less technologies. With a zero percent defect rate and the use of all green materials, we are certain that the MAGICSTRAP® LXMS series will be a class leader," stated Gerry Hubers, business development manager - new products, for Murata Electronics North America. "As demand for these products continues to increase, we intend on raising the bar industry-wide to constantly push the boundaries of RFID technology."

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