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A Beacon of Light

Fri, 09/28/2001 - 9:31am
By Kim Stokes, Editor-in-Chief


We will never forget September 11, 2001. We will always remember where we were when we realized our nation was under attack. While our offices are 30 miles from New York City, I remember my first thoughts when I heard planes had crashed into the World Trade Center — Cahners has offices in New York City and Cahners HQ used to be in Newton, MA where some of our employees travel to on a regular basis. My heart sank as I watched a small black and white TV with my co-workers and the unthinkable become reality.

We all know someone who was involved in this senseless tragedy, whether it be someone who lost their life, someone who lost a loved one, or one of the heroic rescue workers. Sadly, two well-respected Cahners employees were on one of the planes that crashed that day — Jeffrey Mladenik, interim CEO of eLogic and Andrew Curry Green, Director of Business Development at eLogic. Our condolences go out to everyone who experienced a loss during this horrific event.

As the week unfolded, I experienced a flood of emotions. I was sad, frightened, angry, and disgusted that someone could do this to innocent people.

I just can't comprehend this senseless act. Words of condolences and concern from contacts around the world brought me much comfort. Thank you to everyone who showed their concern for the Wireless Design & Development staff.

The healing for me began two days after the terrorist attacks. By then, everyone was aware of the cell phone calls that had been made by flight attendants and passengers and from people stuck in the rubble of the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. While making my commute that day, I listened as two NYC DJs praised not only the heroes who used their cell phones, but the wireless community as a whole. I've never been so proud of the industry that I work in as I was at that moment.

I know that I don't design these wireless devices, but I believe that we — editors, designers, engineers, everyone in this industry — had a hand in bringing those last comforting words to so many families. Since the tragedy, there has been an outpouring of generosity from the wireless community. Throughout the industry, companies have donated cellular and satellite phones, two-way radios and batteries to rescue workers; provided unlimited wireless service for government officials and relief workers; added additional operators to cell phone networks; provided additional wireline and cellular circuits; videoconferencing companies donated equipment and opened sites for victims to communicate with distant relatives. The list goes on.

While emerging technologies and services, including e911, strive to provide more of the security that consumers will demand in light of recent events, I am so thankful for the existing wireless capabilities we have. Simply thanking this industry doesn't seem to be enough - you've renewed my hope when I thought it was shattered; you've motivated me to provide you with the best possible information that you can get your hands on; you've brought peace to people you don't even know, without even trying; you've touched the world in a way that no one ever imagined wireless could; you've made a difference. I know as the wireless industry reaches for new heights, that together we can continue to bring that beacon of light to the world.

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