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Power Management Solutions

Mon, 04/30/2001 - 6:15am

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California Micro Devices announced the availability of its new CMPWR330 which provides a power management solution targeting PCI adapter cards and other systems operating from multiple power sources. The CMPWR330 combines two LDO (Low Dropout) regulators with a switch to provide up to 400 mA of load current at a fixed 3.3 V output. The switch is implemented using CAMD's SmartOR™ technology, which provides a continuous "glitch" free regulated output with built-in hysteresis.

In order for systems to satisfy Instantly Available PC (IAPC) power management requirements, a continuous 3.3 V needs to be provided, based upon a variety of available system power sources. The CMPWR330 satisfies this power requirement by switching between one of three input sources on a priority basis. The output is supplied from an internal 3.3 V LDO operating from either the 5 V (5 VCC) or standby (5 VSBY) inputs when available. If neither the VCC nor VSBY inputs are available a 3.3 V auxiliary (3.3VAUX) supply is selected.

The CMPWR330 is packaged in a thermally enhanced 8-pin SOIC which is ideal for applications where the printed circuit board space is limited. This package uses a fused leadframe where the ground pins are integral to the leadframe so that a printed circuit board can act as a "heat spreader."

Additionally, California Micro Devices is releasing pin for pin replacements for the popular CMPWR100 and CMPWR120 power management devices. Both new devices have improved load current specifications and a price advantage over the previous generation products. The new CMPWR101 is the 250 mA replacement for the 200 mA CMPWR100. The CMPWR130 is the 300 mA replacement for the 250 mA CMPWR120. These devices are available in standard in 8-pin SOIC packages.

These new California Micro Devices Power Management products are ideally suited for reducing component count in personal computers implementing a wake-on-LAN function for NICs (Network Interface Cards) or wake- on-ring in modems. They are also used in non-PC applications requiring standby power.

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