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Stanford Professors Named IEEE Fellows for Engineering Achievements

December 12, 2014 11:17 am | by Chris Cesare, Stanford Engineering | Comments

Thomas Lee, Sanjay Lall, Boris Murmann, and Christos Kozyrakis, all members of the electrical engineering faculty at Stanford, have been named IEEE fellows in recognition of their extraordinary achievements in engineering ...          

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Fuel Cells A Long Way From Mainstream, Despite Toyota Launch

December 12, 2014 11:10 am | by Neil Winton, Forbes Contributor | Comments

You would think that when an automotive giant like Toyota declared its fuel cell car ready for prime time, questions about hydrogen technology had been laid to rest. You’d be wrong. The loudest critics of fuel cells may have axes to grind. Electric car maker Telsa Motors’ CEO Elon Musk says hydrogen is more suitable for the upper stage of rockets than ... 

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How Can We Build Safer Infrastructure?

December 12, 2014 11:04 am | by Brigham A. McCown, Forbes Contributor | Comments

The excavation and construction efforts required to maintain and manage the complex web of underground infrastructure is a laborious activity, invisible to most. This work helps ensure the reliability of infrastructure vital to bringing the natural gas, electricity, and data services to homes and businesses in every ... 

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Nintendo Wii Helps Stroke Victims with Physiotherapy

December 12, 2014 10:51 am | by Lancaster University | Comments

Stroke survivors can have “significant” improvement in arm movements after using the Nintendo Wii as physiotherapy according to researchers ...                                                 

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Blrt App Helps You Get Work Done Without Unnecessary Meetings

December 12, 2014 10:11 am | by Jason Lim, Forbes Contributor | Comments

Work often gets done through meetings, whether they are face to face or over programs like Skype. Meetings help us share and present ideas, debate topics and get in sync. But many times, you are probably sitting there wondering why you need to be there, some of you may have even fallen asleep. According to research by ... 

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New Theory Could Make for More Flexible Digital Communication

December 12, 2014 9:57 am | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | Comments

Communication protocols for digital devices are very efficient but also very brittle: They require information to be specified in a precise order with a precise number of bits. If sender and receiver — say, a computer and a printer — are off by even a single bit relative to each other, communication between them breaks down ... 

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Photo of the Day: Real-Time Information of Brain Damage

December 11, 2014 4:16 pm | by Alex Reid, Tufts University | Comments

Coherent hemodynamics spectroscopy (CHS), developed and published by Tufts Professor of Biomedical Engineering Sergio Fantini, measures blood flow, blood volume, and oxygen consumption in the brain. It uses non-invasive near infrared (NIR) light technology to scan brain tissue, and then ...                     

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A New Way to Diagnose Brain Damage from Concussions, Strokes & Dementia

December 11, 2014 4:14 pm | by Alex Reid, Tufts University | Comments

New optical diagnostic technology developed at Tufts University School of Engineering promises new ways to identify and monitor brain damage resulting from traumatic injury, stroke or vascular dementia--in real time and without invasive procedures ...                   

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Penn Research Outlines Basic Rules for Construction With a Type of Origami

December 11, 2014 2:00 pm | by Evan Lerner, University of Pennsylvania | Comments

Origami is capable of turning a simple sheet of paper into a pretty paper crane, but the principles behind the paper-folding art can also be applied to making a microfluidic device for a blood test, or for storing a satellite's solar panel in a rocket’s cargo bay ...             

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Tracking What Students Grasp with Mobile Devices

December 11, 2014 1:28 pm | by Rob Matheson, MIT News Office | Comments

As a teaching assistant at the MIT Sloan School of Management in 2010, Amit Maimon MBA ’11 witnessed the origins of a technological phenomenon: Smartphones and tablets had started creeping into the classroom in the hands of students ...                

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Photos of the Day: U.S. Navy Successfully Deploys Laser Weapon

December 11, 2014 12:16 pm | by WDD Staff | Comments

The laser goes from the weapon of tomorrow to the weapon of today as the US Navy announces the completion of its successful deployment of the Office of Naval Research's (ONR) Laser Weapon System (LaWS). The deployment is the first on a US Naval vessel and took place on the USS Ponce (LPD-15) in the Arabian Gulf from September to ... 

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Changing the Face of the Tech Industry

December 11, 2014 10:44 am | by MICHAEL LIEDTKE, AP Technology Writer | Comments

Despite all their wealth and brainpower, technology companies realize they need help identifying and recruiting more women, blacks, and Latinos who can write computer code, design websites, and build mobile applications ...                          

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Survey Shows Internet's Broadening Political Role

December 11, 2014 10:30 am | by Associated Press | Comments

Would-be 2016 presidential candidates take note: the Internet may potentially make or break your campaign. More Internet users than ever view online efforts as key to political campaigns, according to a survey released Thursday by the University of Southern California ...                 

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Affordable Internet Access should Be a Human Right

December 11, 2014 10:27 am | by SYLVIA HUI, Associated Press | Comments

The computer scientist credited with inventing the World Wide Web says affordable access to the Internet should be recognized as a human right, as a report showed that billions of people still cannot go online and government surveillance and censorship are increasing ...          

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Organic Electronics Could Lead to Cheap, Wearable Medical Sensors

December 11, 2014 9:57 am | by Sarah Yang, Media Relations, UC Berkeley | Comments

Future fitness trackers could soon add blood-oxygen levels to the list of vital signs measured with new technology developed by engineers at UC Berkeley. “There are various pulse oximeters already on the market that measure pulse rate and blood-oxygen saturation levels, but those devices use rigid conventional electronics, and they are usually ...

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