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GE Eyes Growth By Linking Machines, People, Data

October 10, 2014 2:25 pm | by GE Reports | Comments

Nobody wants to be late. But at a busy airline hub like Atlanta or Chicago, even a brief delay in aircraft arrival can result in missed connections and cascade into a major inconvenience. The Bureau of Transportation Statistics reported that ...

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Sensor Uses Radio Waves to Detect Subtle Changes in Pressure

October 10, 2014 1:14 pm | by Stanford School of Engineering | Comments

Stanford engineers have invented a wireless pressure sensor that has already been used to measure brain pressure in lab mice with brain injuries. The underlying technology has such broad potential that it could one day be used to create skin-like materials that can sense pressure, leading to prosthetic devices...

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First-of-Its-Kind Geostationary Lightning Mapper Completed for GOES-R Satellite

October 10, 2014 1:08 pm | by NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center | Comments

The Geostationary Lightning Mapper instrument for NOAA's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite – R (GOES-R) completed development and testing and is now ready for integration with the spacecraft. The GOES-R satellite will be the first flight of this sophisticated lightning mapping...

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Miniature Camera May Lead to Fewer Accidents

October 10, 2014 1:03 pm | by Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft | Comments

All too often, a driver has only fractions of a second to decide when facing a potential car accident: A brief moment of distraction, overtiredness or inattention – there are several reasons why the number of accidents in Germany is high, on the autobahns most of all. According to data from the Federal Statistical Office...

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Electrically Conductive Plastics Promising for Batteries, Solar Cells

October 10, 2014 11:02 am | by Purdue University | Comments

An emerging class of electrically conductive plastics called "radical polymers” may bring low-cost, transparent solar cells, flexible and lightweight batteries, and ultrathin antistatic coatings for consumer electronics and aircraft. Researchers have established the solid-state electrical properties of one such polymer...

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Photos of the Day: DROID Flys with Auto-GCAS

October 10, 2014 10:53 am | by NASA | Comments

A new NASA-developed Automatic Ground-Collision Avoidance System that could significantly reduce the incidence of controlled flight into terrain aircraft accidents is currently being integrated into the flight control systems of the U.S. Air Force's fleet of F-16 fighter aircraft. The new software, pioneered at NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center...

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NASA-Pioneered Automatic Ground-Collision Avoidance System Operational

October 10, 2014 10:44 am | by NASA | Comments

A new NASA-developed Automatic Ground-Collision Avoidance System that could significantly reduce the incidence of controlled flight into terrain aircraft accidents is currently being integrated into the flight control systems of the U.S. Air Force's fleet of F-16 fighter aircraft. The new software, pioneered at NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center...

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You Have a Phone. Do You Need New Camera from HTC?

October 10, 2014 10:08 am | by Anick Jesdanun, AP Technology Writer | Comments

Everywhere you look, people are using smartphones and tablets to snap pictures and record video of concerts, speeches or even their kids' ballet recitals — and instantly share the experiences with friends and family. At many events, people aren't even looking at the stage; they are watching through their screens...

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Symantec Says It Will Split into 2 Companies

October 10, 2014 9:59 am | by The Associated Press | Comments

Security software maker Symantec is the latest company to announce plans to split itself into two. The maker of Norton antivirus software said Thursday that it will separate into one business focused on security and the other on information management. Symantec said that separating its businesses...

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Darwin Note, Early Apple Computer Being Auctioned

October 10, 2014 9:56 am | by Ula Ilnytzky, Associated Press | Comments

A letter by Charles Darwin on the sex life of barnacles and a still-working vintage Apple computer — one of only 50 made in Steve Jobs' garage in 1976 — are among the unique pieces of science history up for auction this month. Buyers at the Oct. 22 event at Bonhams will need deep pockets...

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With Z3, Sony Brings Phones to US Faster

October 10, 2014 9:49 am | by Anick Jesdanun, AP Technology Writer | Comments

Sony is launching its new Xperia Z3 waterproof smartphone through Verizon and T-Mobile. The phones are hitting U.S. stores on the heels of their unveiling last month at a trade show in Berlin, as Sony ramps up efforts to expand its tiny market share by getting to the American market faster...

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Apply Now: Obama Gets a Job Offer in California

October 10, 2014 9:44 am | by The Associated Press | Comments

He's still got two years left on his current contract, but President Barack Obama is already fantasizing about the day he can go to work in sweatpants. And he's got at least one job offer. Obama was answering questions Thursday from young entrepreneurs...

Photo of the Day: Microcamera Module with Image Sensor

October 9, 2014 11:09 am | by Andreas Ostmann, Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft | Comments

One particular feature of the system: in contrast to the conventional driver assistance systems on the market, the image material is processed – and thus, the traffic signage interpreted – directly inside the camera, since it is equipped with an integrated processor for image processing...              

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Miniature Camera May Lead to Fewer Accidents

October 9, 2014 11:08 am | by Andreas Ostmann, Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft | Comments

According to data from the Federal Statistical Office, the number of deadly casualties on German autobahns in 2013 rose by more than eight percent when compared to the prior year...                             

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Miniature Wireless Device Provides Better Way of Studying Chronic Pain

October 9, 2014 10:38 am | by Amy Adams, Stanford University | Comments

A team of Stanford engineers is creating a small wireless device that will improve studies of chronic pain. The engineers hope to use what they learn to develop better therapies for the condition, which costs the economy $600 billion a year...                    

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