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Low Power IP Solutions for SoC Design at Embedded World 2012

Tue, 01/31/2012 - 4:33am

Cortus S.A., and Silicon Storage Technology will be showing their low power IP products for embedded system on chip (SoC) designs at Embedded World 2012 in Nuremberg, Germany. The exhibit will combine Cortus’ silicon efficient, ultra low power 32 bit microcontroller cores with SST’s low power, ultra high endurance embedded flash non-volatile memory (NVM) technology.

Today’s embedded SoC applications such as SIM cards, Near Field Communications (NFC), Bluetooth LE, automotive sensors and smart meters all require a combination of a microcontroller core and flash memory. Such applications require minimising both power dissipation and silicon area. The Cortus APS3 offers the smallest silicon footprint and power dissipation on the market for 32 bit processor cores. SST SuperFlash technology provides a compact, low power embedded flash memory solution with ultra high endurance.
The Embedded World 2012 exhibition runs from the 28th February to 1st March at the Exhibition Centre Nuremberg and is recognised as Europe’s largest industry event for embedded systems. Cortus S.A. and SST will be exhibiting at Embedded World and will be located at Stand 143 in Hall 5.

Cortus offers high performance 32-bit processor cores designed specifically for embedded systems. The APS3 features a tiny silicon footprint (same size as an 8051), very low power consumption, high code density and high performance (up to 1.67 DMIPS/MHz). The ecosystem around the Cortus processors includes a full development environment (for C and C++), commonly used peripherals, bus bridges to ensure easy interfacing to other IP and system support and functions such as cache and memory management units. The APS3 processor core is currently in volume production in a range of products from security applications to ultra low power wireless designs.

SST Superflash memory technology is the most widely licensed flash NVM technology today, and is commonly used in microcontrollers and automotive and smartcard devices. In 2010 alone, over four billion devices worldwide were manufactured using this technology.

http://www.cortus.com

 

Posted by Janine E. Mooney, Editor

January 31, 2012 

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