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Photos of the Day: NASA Tech Sees Birth of the Universe

March 18, 2014 7:35 pm | by NASA | Comments

The BICEP2 telescope at the South Pole used a specialized array of superconducting detectors to capture polarized light from billions of years ago. Techniques called micro-lithography and micro-machining are used to fabricate the devices. The sensors were used to make the first detection of gravitational waves...

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NIST Chips Help Find Evidence of Universe's Origin

March 18, 2014 7:23 pm | by National Institute of Standards and Technology | Comments

Astronomers are announcing that they have acquired the first direct evidence that gravitational waves rippled through our infant universe during an explosive period of growth called inflation. This is the strongest confirmation yet of cosmic inflation theories, which say the universe expanded by 100 trillion trillion times...

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Google Redesigns Android to Power Smartwatches

March 18, 2014 6:45 pm | by Michael Liedtke, AP Technology Writer | Comments

Google thinks it's time for an Internet-connected watch that performs many of the same tasks as a smartphone but with fewer distractions and rude interruptions. The Internet's most influential company is trying to unleash a new era in mobile computing with a version of its Android software...

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Superconductive LEDs Opens New Window to Quantum Devices

March 18, 2014 6:41 pm | by University of Toronto | Comments

A team of physicists has proposed a novel and efficient way to leverage the strange quantum physics phenomenon known as entanglement. The approach would involve combining LEDs with a superconductor to generate entangled photons and could open up a rich spectrum of new physics...

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Reducing Anxiety With a Smartphone App

March 18, 2014 6:34 pm | by Association for Psychological Science | Comments

Playing a science-based mobile gaming app for 25 minutes can reduce anxiety in stressed individuals, according to research. The study suggests that “gamifying” a scientifically-supported intervention could offer measurable mental health and behavioral benefits for people with relatively high levels of anxiety...

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Nanotube Composites Increase Efficiency of Next-Gen Solar Cells

March 18, 2014 6:29 pm | by Umea University | Comments

Carbon nanotubes are becoming increasingly attractive for photovoltaic solar cells as a replacement to silicon. Researchers have discovered that controlled placement of the carbon nanotubes into nano-structures produces a huge boost in electronic performance...

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Antimony Nanocrystals for Batteries

March 18, 2014 5:34 pm | Comments

Researchers have succeeded for the first time to produce uniform antimony nanocrystals. Tested as components of laboratory batteries, these are able to store a large number of both lithium and sodium ions. These nanomaterials operate with high rate and may eventually be used as alternative anode materials...

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Video-Game Device Prevents Patient Falls

March 18, 2014 5:26 pm | by University of Missouri-Columbia | Comments

Technology used in video games is making its way to hospital rooms, where researchers at the University of Missouri hope to learn new ways to prevent falls among hospital patients. Between 700,000 and 1 million people each year fall in U.S. hospitals. Hospitals nationwide are looking for ways to reduce that number...

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Thailand Gives Radar Data 10 Days After Plane Lost

March 18, 2014 3:23 pm | by Thanyarat Doksone, Associated Press | Comments

Thailand's military said Tuesday that its radar detected a plane that may have been Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 just minutes after the jetliner's communications went down, and that it didn't share the information with Malaysia earlier because it wasn't specifically asked for it...

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Tiny Switches Could Support Next-Generation Wireless Networks

March 18, 2014 3:03 pm | by GE Reports | Comments

Researchers working in GE labs have developed tiny electrical switches thinner than a human hair that can transmit kilowatts of power. They are called micro-electro-mechanical systems, or MEMS. The technology’s DNA is built around industrial applications...

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'Vanishing' Electronics and Powerful Nanomaterials

March 18, 2014 2:29 pm | by American Chemical Society | Comments

Brain sensors and electronic tags that dissolve. Boosting the potential of renewable energy sources. These are examples of the latest research from two pioneering scientists. Tackling health and sustainability issues simultaneously, John Rogers, Ph.D., is developing a vast toolbox of materials...

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More Reliable, Power Efficient Flexible Carbon Nanotube Circuits

March 18, 2014 2:18 pm | by Stanford School of Engineering | Comments

Engineers would love to create flexible electronic devices, such as e-readers that could be folded to fit into a pocket. One approach they are trying involves designing circuits based on electronic fibers, known as carbon nanotubes, instead of rigid silicon chips...

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Stretchable Antenna for Wearable Health Monitoring

March 18, 2014 2:00 pm | by North Carolina State University | Comments

Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a new, stretchable antenna that can be incorporated into wearable technologies, such as health monitoring devices. “Many researchers – including our lab – have developed prototype sensors for wearable health systems..."

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Why Do Airplane Transponders Have an 'Off Switch?'

March 18, 2014 10:20 am | by Joan Lowy & Scott Mayerowitz, Associated Press | Comments

Ever since Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 disappeared, a fascinated public has asked: Why can somebody in the cockpit shut off the transponder? It turns out there are several legitimate reasons why a pilot might want to shut off this key form of communication...

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Volvo Researches Driver Sensors, Cars Get to Know Their Drivers

March 18, 2014 10:12 am | by Volvo | Comments

Through systems that can recognize and distinguish whether a driver is tired or inattentive, the car of the future can become even safer. Examples of this include technology that detect closed eyes or what the driver is looking at. “This will enable the driver to be able to rely..."

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