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Microsoft Buying Nokia Phones, Patents for $7.2B

September 3, 2013 11:17 am | by The Associated Press | Comments

Microsoft is buying Nokia's line-up of smartphones and a portfolio of patents and services in an attempt to mount a more formidable challenge to Apple and Google as more people pursue their lives on mobile devices. The 5.44 billion euros ($7.2 billion) deal was announced late Monday.

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Hands-Free Dog Walking for the Digital Age

September 3, 2013 11:15 am | by Inderscience Publishers | Comments

That old "best friend" can get a bit tiresome, all that rolling over, shaking paws, long walks and eating every crumb of food off the floor. But, what if there were a way to command your dog with a remote control, or even via your smart phone...or even without hands?

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Almost As Sensitive As a Dog's Nose

August 29, 2013 1:30 pm | by Hyung Gyu Park, ETH Zurich | Comments

Scientists at ETH Zurich and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California have developed an innovative sensor for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. Thanks to its unique surface properties at nanoscale, the method can be used to perform analyses that are more reliable, sensitive, and cost-effective. In experiments with the new sensor.

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50 Years Later, Hotline to Moscow Still Relevant

August 29, 2013 12:18 pm | by DAVID DISHNEAU, Associated Press | Comments

The Washington-Moscow Hotline is not just a Cold War relic, but a system for top-level crisis communications that remains a useful tool for U.S. and Russian leaders at odds over their relations with Syria and Iran, a former director of the Soviet space exploration program says.

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Ultracold Big Bang Experiment Successfully Simulates Evolution of Early Universe

August 29, 2013 12:15 pm | by Steve Koppes, University of Chicago | Comments

Researchers have reproduced a pattern resembling the cosmic microwave background radiation in a laboratory simulation of the big bang, using ultracold cesium atoms in a vacuum chamber at the University of Chicago. "This is the first time an experiment like this has simulated the evolution.

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Space Laser to Prove Increased Broadband Possible

August 29, 2013 9:12 am | by NASA | Comments

When NASA’s Lunar Laser Communication Demonstration begins operation aboard the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer mission managed by NASA’s Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, CA, it will attempt to show two-way laser communication beyond Earth is possible, expanding the possibility of transmitting huge amounts of data.

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Vodafone in Talks to Sell Verizon Wireless Stake

August 29, 2013 8:55 am | by DANICA KIRKA, Associated Press | Comments

Britain's Vodafone PLC, one of the world's largest cellphone companies, confirmed Thursday that it was talking to Verizon Communications about selling its U.S. operations. The U.K. company is mulling its options for its 45 percent stake in the U.S.'s Verizon Wireless, of which Verizon Communications owns the other 55 percent.

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First U.S. Surgery Transmitted Live Via Google Glass

August 29, 2013 8:45 am | by Ohio State University | Comments

A surgeon at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center is the first in the United States to consult with a distant colleague using live, point-of-view video from the operating room via Google Glass, a head-mounted computer and camera device.

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1st U.S.-Made Smartphone Just as Cheap to Produce

August 29, 2013 8:40 am | by Associated Press | Comments

The Moto X is the first smartphone to carry the "Made in the U.S.A." designation. Labor costs are higher in the U.S. compared with Asian factories, where phones are typically made. But IHS said the Moto X is about 5 percent cheaper to make than Samsung Electronic's flagship Galaxy S4 phone.

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Princeton and USDA Researchers Produce New Egg Pasteurization Method

August 29, 2013 8:39 am | by John Greenwald, DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory | Comments

Researchers at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) have developed a novel technique and device for rapidly pasteurizing eggs in the shell without damaging the delicate egg white. The process could lead to a sharp reduction in illnesses caused by egg-borne salmonella bacteria, a widespread public health concern.

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Autonomous Vehicles Are Tomorrow: Here’s What Transportation Tech is Doing Today

August 29, 2013 8:37 am | by The American Association of State Highway & Transportation Officials | Comments

Just as patients communicate their symptoms to doctors – smart technology is allowing infrastructure to tell civil engineers when something is wrong. Sensors installed on bridges, in roadways, and on maintenance vehicles, are communicating real-time performance and weather data, allowing engineers to solve problems before they occur.

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NYC Transit App Competition Asks Public to Vote

August 28, 2013 9:48 am | by Associated Press | Comments

The agency that runs New York City's subways and buses is inviting the public to try out and weigh in on dozens of new apps designed to ease getting around. The Metropolitan Transportation Authority and AT&T released 49 new apps on Tuesday. They were developed in a competition to create new mobile tools that draw on real-time MTA data.

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China to Launch Unmanned Lunar Lander by Year-End

August 28, 2013 9:41 am | by Associated Press | Comments

China says it will launch its first unmanned lunar lander by the end of this year. The Chang'e 3 lander will carry a radio-controlled rover to transmit images and dig into the moon's surface to test samples. The State Administration of Science, Technology and Industry for National Defense said Wednesday the lander had officially entered the launch stage.

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Control Scheme Dynamically Maintains Unstable Quantum System

August 28, 2013 9:40 am | by John Toon, Georgia Institute of Technology | Comments

A simple pendulum has two equilibrium points: hanging in the "down" position and perfectly inverted in the "up" position. While the "down" position is a stable equilibrium, the inverted position is definitely not stable. Any infinitesimal deviation from perfectly inverted is enough to cause the pendulum to eventually swing down.

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Georgia Tech Team Supports Open Architecture Software Standards for Military Avionics

August 28, 2013 9:35 am | by Lance Wallace, Georgia Tech University | Comments

Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology are helping the U.S. military make key changes in how aircraft electronic systems, called avionics, are produced. The effort focuses on modifying the design of avionics software, especially the ways in which it interfaces with an aircraft's hardware and other software.

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